Additional Endorsements

Complex

A Complex endorsement in your pilot logbook allows you  to fly airplanes with retractable landing gear, and is obtained in a plane that also has controllable prop and wing flaps.  By learning to manage a plane with a few more systems, you can fly planes that are faster and more efficient.  The FAA does not require a checkride, and does not sub-divide this training between single-engine versus multi-engine.  If you are already multi-rated, you should already have this endorsement.

This isn't just a checkout in one plane, but a doorway to all retractable-gear planes.  So, we will show you examples of common variations manufacturers have used over the years.  If you already have experience with different sizes of engines and controllable-prop levers, this training can be accomplished in a day.  If you are moving up from light, fixed-prop planes, we suggest you budget for 3-5 hours of ground and 2-3 flights.

We can do this training in either a customer's airplane, or our Piper Arrow (PA-28R-200).  Like every other FBO, our insurance has certain minimum experience requirements to rent a retractable-gear plane after getting endorsed.  However, we are able to review each case individually, especially when the Complex training was done through us.

High Altitude

To fly an aircraft capable of flying higher than 25,000 feet (FL250), the FAA requires the pilot to have this logbook endorsement.  Ground and flight training covers aero-medical effects of high altitude, oxygen systems, pressurization systems, normal and abnormal operations, and associated regulations.

This training is usually done using a pressurized airplane (or authorized simulator) to which you have access and will be using, and can be accomplished in one day.

High Performance

A High Performance endorsement in your pilot logbook allows you to fly an airplane with more than 200 max-rated horsepower "in an engine".  In other words, a plane with four 190-hp engines wouldn't fit the definition - it's all about how bigger engines like to be handled.  The  FAA does not require a checkride, and does not sub-divide this training between single-engine versus multi-engine planes.

This isn't just a checkout in one plane, but a doorway to all planes with more power.  So, we will show you examples of common types of engines including: fuel injection, turbo-charging, manual versus automated controls, and differences between manufacturers.  Most engines over 200-hp have controllable prop systems, so we will make sure you are comfortable with those systems as well.

We are happy to use our experience with various kinds of these aircraft to help you gain this fun and useful endorsement, usually in just a few flights, in whatever airplane you will be using.

Tailwheel

A Tailwheel endorsement in your logbook allows you to fly these kinds of planes - sometimes called "tail-draggers", or "conventional gear" back in the good ol' days.  This group of planes includes some of the best utility, sport, aerobatic, and rough-airport planes out there, not to mention a major portion of all civilian and military types built through the 1960's.

The majority of tailwheel ground and flight training focuses on takeoff and landing traits of the plane you are using, given that the center of gravity is on the other side of the main landing gear, compared to nose-wheel planes.  These handling traits will also vary depending on whether the runway is paved, dirt, gravel, etc., and tire type/ inflation level.

We are happy to use our experience with various kinds of these aircraft to help you gain this fun and useful endorsement,  in whatever airplane you will be using.  Someone new to tailwheel planes will often need 5-7 hours of ground instruction, and 5-10 hours of flight instruction.

 

 
 
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